Educate Yourself: Racism & Public Health

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Please note that listed sites are not necessarily endorsed by #TheWorldIsWatching. The following links are provided in good faith to educate our community members. These links are complimentary to our Issue Briefing: Racism is a Public Health Crisis.

If you have additional links you would like listed here, please contact us.

Educate Yourself: Black Literature, Films, Art

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Please note that listed sites are not necessarily endorsed by #TheWorldIsWatching. The following links are provided in good faith to educate our community members.

Online Texts

Print Texts

Note: To support the Black community, particularly amidst a pandemic that has disproportionately affected them and other communities of color, we recommend purchasing from independent, Black-owned bookstores. For lists of Black-owned bookstores that process online orders, click here or here.

  • Paul Mendez, Rainbow Milk (2020)
  • Candice Carty-Williams, Queenie (2019)
  • Derek Owusu, That Reminds Me (2019)
  • Bernardine Evaristo, Girl, Woman, Other (2019)
  • Ta-Nehisi Coates, The Water Dancer (2019)
  • Jesmyn Ward, Sing, Unburied, Sing (2018)
  • Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give (2017)
  • Jamel Brinkley, A Lucky Man (2018)
  • Suzan Lori-Parks, Father Comes Home From the Wars (2015)
  • Jacqueline Woodson, Brown Girl Dreaming (2014, children and young adults)
  • Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah (2013)
  • Toni Morrison, Beloved (1988)
  • Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon (1977)
  • Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye (1970)

Films, Documentaries, TV Series

  • Just Mercy, Destin Daniel Cretton (2019)
  • I Am Not Your Negro, Raoul Peck (2016)
  • The Rachel Divide, Laura Brownson (2018)
  • 12 Years A Slave, Steve McQueen (2013)
  • When They See Us, Ava DuVernay (2019)
  • 13th, Ava DuVernay (2016)*
  • Selma, Ava DuVernay (2014)
  • The Hate U Give, George Tillman Jr. (2018)
  • Dear White People, Justin Simien (2017)
  • American Son, Kenny Leon (2019)
  • In My Blood It Runs, Maya Newell
  • Hidden Figures, Theodore Melfi (2016)
  • If Beale Street Could Talk, Barry Jenkins (2019)
  • Clemency, Chinonye Chukwu (2019)
  • Get Out, Jordan Peele (2017)
  • The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, Stanley Nelson Jr. (2015)
  • La Haine, Mathieu Kassovitz (1995)
  • Les Misérables, Ladj Ly (2019)
  • Divines, Houda Benyamina (2016)
  • The Hurricane, Norman Jewison (1999)
  • A Voix haute, Amandine Gay (2017)

Additional Lists

If you have additional links you would like listed here, please contact us.

Educate Yourself: Black History & Society

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Please note that listed sites are not necessarily endorsed by #TheWorldIsWatching. The following links are provided in good faith to educate our community members. For original research and commentary by our organization, please check out our Issue Briefings series.

Videos & Podcasts

Online Texts

Print Texts

Note: To support the Black community, particularly amidst a pandemic that has disproportionately affected them and other communities of color, we recommend purchasing from independent, Black-owned bookstores. For lists of Black-owned bookstores that process online orders, click here or here.

  • Layla F. Saad, Me and White Supremacy: A 28-Day Challenge to Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor (2019)
  • Elisa Camahort Page, Carolyn Gerin, Jamia Wilson, Road Map for Revolutionaries (2018)
  • Mahzarin R. Banaji, Anthony G. Greenwald, Blind Spot: Hidden Biases of Good People (2013)
  • Dr. Jennifer Eberhardt, Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudices that Shape Our Lives (2020)
  • Dr. Pragya Agarwal, Sway: Unravelling Unconscious Bias (2020)
  • Ruth King, Mindful of Race: Understanding and Transforming Habits of Harm (2018, nonfiction)
  • Ijeomo Oluo, So You Want to Talk About Race (2018, nonfiction)
  • Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism (2018, nonfiction)*
  • Ibrahim X. Kendi, How to be an Antiracist (2019, nonfiction)
  • Dorothy Roberts, Fatal Intervention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Recreate Race in the Twenty-First Century (2012, nonfiction)
  • Kalwant Bhopal, White Privilege: The Myth of a Post-Racial Society (2018, nonfiction)
  • Angela Saini, Superior: The Return of Race Science (2019, nonfiction)
  • Michele Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (2010, criminal justice)
  • Angela Davis, Are Prisons Obsolete? (2003, criminal justice)
  • Ed Gordon, Conversations in Black: On Politics, Power and Leadership (2020, leadership)
  • Paul Ortiz, An African American and Latinx History of the United States (2018, history)
  • Paul Butler, Chokehold: Policing Black Men (2017, criminal justice)
  • Damon Young, What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker: A Memoir in Essays (2019, memoir)
  • Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969, autobiography)
  • Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me (2015, memoir)
  • Ta-Nehisi Coates, We Were Eight Years in Power (2017, essays)
  • Ibrahim X. Kendi, Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America (2016, nonfiction)
  • Patrisse Cullors and Asha Bandele, When They Call You a Terrorist (2020, memoir from the BLM cofounders)
  • Audre Lorde, Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches (1984, essays)
  • James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time (1963, nonfiction)
  • bell hooks, Ain’t I A Woman (1981, dissertation): named after Sojourner Truth’s 1851 speech
  • Toni Morrison, The Source of Self-Regard (2019, essays)
  • Jim Wallis, America’s Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America (2015)
  • Mira Jacob, Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations (2019)
  • Jesmyn Ward, The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks About Race (2017, nonfiction)
  • Claudia Rankine, Citizen: An American Lyric (2014, nonfiction)
  • Roxane Dunbar-Ortiz, An Indigenous People’s History of the United States (2015, history)
  • Kiese Laymon, Heavy: An American Memoir (2018, memoir)
  • Akiba Solomon, How We Fight White Supremacy (2018, essays)
  • Michael Eric Dyson, Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America (2017, nonfiction)
  • Richard Rothstein, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America (2017, history)
  • Mumia Abu-Jamal, Have Black Lives Ever Mattered? (2017, nonfiction)
  • Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Greatest Migration (2014, history)
  • Mikki Kendall, Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot (2020, nonfiction)
  • Carol Anderson, PhD, White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide (2017, nonfiction)
  • Ashraf H. A. Rushdy, American Lynching (2014, nonfiction)
  • Catherine Morris, We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women 1965-85 (2017, nonfiction)
  • Solomon Northup, Twelve Years A Slave (1853, nonfiction)

If you have additional resources you would like listed here, please contact us.

Donate Money & Time

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Please note that listed sites are not necessarily endorsed by #TheWorldIsWatching. The following links are provided in good faith, but we recommend that all donors carefully research their prospective recipients before transferring any money.

Please note: change.org donations do not necessarily support particular causes or petitions on the website, but are often used by change.org to promote the petition and/or may go to company profits. If you would like to support any particular cause on change.org, we recommend contacting the organizer to ask how best to make your contribution.

If you have additional links you would like listed here, please contact us.

BLM Global Network Resources

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Are you a Black Lives Matter organizer, or interested in becoming one? Browse our collection of resources for the BLM Global Network, including organizing guides curated by our core team, anonymous crowd-sourced global protest trackers, and more.


Guide: Trauma-Informed Approach. How to Check In During a Crisis

This guide explains how to check-in from a trauma-informed approach during a crisis using therapeutic interventions.

Guide: Stopped by Police? Know Your Rights

Being stopped by the police is more than just an interaction for most people. It is a stressful experience that has high potential for things to escalate quickly. In this guide, you will find three different scenarios where your legal rights and strategies for handling police encounters will be identified.

Guide: How to Organize

To amplify and augment global Black Lives Matter organizing, our team assembled a brief 2-page guide on the next steps that leaders and organizers can take to effectively mobilize. Thank you for your work. This is our movement and your moment.

Street Medic Guide

Protesting is physically tiring and presents risks only exacerbated by police use of tear gas and pepper spray. The Paper Revolution Collective has written a comprehensive guide for street medics, including basic first aid and safety advice.

Global Protest Trackers

Multiple organizations have created online maps of Black Lives Matter protests using crowd-sourced data gathering. View the trackers below to see protests that have occurred near you or to anonymously report demonstrations you have been a part of.

Gentle Reminders from Our Founders

Organizing is deeply inspiring but can be very draining, particularly for movement leaders. Read a message from our founding members offering gentle reminders about what’s important and how to keep going in our global fight against systemic racism and injustice.

Issue Briefings

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Our core team brings a wide variety of backgrounds and expertise, from building diverse coalitions in global politics to writing domestic health policy. Our supporters, ranging from policy professionals to students, offer even more perspectives. Our Issue Briefing series presents short, digestible policy discussions on systemic racism and the countless sectors it impacts.

Please contact us if you would like to write an Issue Briefing.


Narrowing the Racial Wealth Gap Through Housing Investment

Jennifer Zhang | Director of Outreach
July 2020

Addressing Health Care Disparities with National CLAS Standards

Britney Paddy, QMHP | Director of Corporate Compliance & Organizational Psychology
July 2020

Racism is a Public Health Crisis

Laurel Huffman, MPH, CPH, RDN, LDN | Director of Public Health Advocacy
June 2020


More Issue Briefings are coming soon!

Online Resources Collection

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The following are webpages, articles, social media accounts, and other resources our research and social media team have gathered for your convenience. Listed resources are not necessarily endorsed by #TheWorldIsWatching.

Donate Money, Time, and Followings

Global News (#TheWorldIsWatching)

If you have additional links you would like listed here, please contact us.

Guidance for Global BLM Organizers

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To amplify and augment global Black Lives Matter organizing, we assembled a brief 2-page guide on the next steps that leaders and organizers can take to effectively mobilize. Thank you for your work. This is our movement and your moment. #BlackLivesMatter #TheWorldIsWatching

This guide was developed in consultation with experienced grassroots organizers and activists.

Global Protest Trackers

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Multiple organizations have created online maps of Black Lives Matter protests using crowd-sourced data gathering.

CREOSOTE ⁠— 3,960 cities or towns worldwide have had BLM protests between May 25, 2020 and June 24, 2020.

AL JAZEERA ⁠— Cities outside of the United States where protests have been held include Buenos Aires, Argentina; Yerevan, Armenia; Perth, Australia; Sydney, Australia; Adelaide, Australia; Brisbane, Australia; Cairns, Australia; Canberra, Australia; Townsville, Australia; Newcastle, Australia; Wyong, Australia; Vienna, Austria; Brussels, Belgium; Ghent, Belgium; Liege, Belgium; Hamilton, Bermuda; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Sofia, Bulgaria; Calgary, Canada; Fredericton, Canada; Halifax, Canada; Moncton, Canada; Montreal, Canada; Ottawa, Canada; Peterborough, Canada; Saskatoon, Canada; Toronto, Canada; Vancouver, Canada; Nicosia, Cyprus; Prague, Czech Republic; Copenhagen, Denmark; Aarhus, Denmark; Oulu, Finland; Helsinki, Finland; Bordeaux, France; Paris, France; Berlin, Germany; Munich, Germany; Bonn, Germany; Bremen, Germany; Cologne, Germany; Dusseldorf, Germany; Frankfurt, Germany; Gottingen, Germany; Jena, Germany; Osnabruck, Germany; Accra, Ghana; Athens, Greece; Thessaloniki, Greece; Reykjavík, Iceland; Kolkata, India; Mashhad, Iran; Dublin, Ireland; Tel Aviv, Israel; Haifa, Israel; Milan, Italy; Rome, Italy; Verona, Italy; Kingston, Jamaica; Tokyo, Japan; Nairobi, Kenya; Pristina, Kosovo; Monrovia, Liberia; Vilnius, Lithuania; Mexico City, Mexico; Guadalajara, Mexico; Amsterdam, Netherlands; Groningen, Netherlands; The Hague, Netherlands; Auckland, New Zealand; Wellington, New Zealand; Christchurch, New Zealand; Dunedin, New Zealand; Tauranga, New Zealand; Abuja, Nigeria; Lagos, Nigeria; Bergen, Norway; Kristiansand, Norway; Oslo, Norway; Tromso, Norway; Karachi, Pakistan; East Jerusalem, Palestine; Quezon City, Philippines; Poznan, Poland; Warsaw, Poland; Lisbon, Portugal; Porto, Portugal; Coimbra, Portugal; Bratislava, Slovakia; Cape Town, South Africa; Pretoria, South Africa; Pretoria, South Africa; Seoul, South Korea; Myeong-dong, South Korea; Barcelona, Spain; Girona, Spain; Zaragoza, Spain; Stockholm, Sweden; Umea, Sweden; Malmo, Sweden; Geneva, Switzerland; Zurich, Switzerland; Tunis, Tunisia; Istanbul, Turkey; Liverpool, United Kingdom; London, United Kingdom; Manchester, United Kingdom; Derry, United Kingdom; Belfast, United Kingdom; Birmingham, United Kingdom; Birmingham, United Kingdom; Sheffield, United Kingdom; Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Portsmouth, United Kingdom; Brighton, United Kingdom; New Alresford, United Kingdom; and Cardiff, Wales.

Gentle Reminders in the Fight Against Systemic Racism and Injustice

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To our friends in the international community: I must start with thank you.  What started as a personal attempt to encourage compassion and solidarity around the injustices against Black and Brown people in the US has grown to an international movement. I am so thankful to each and every voice that has used their space in support of these efforts.

  1. To all persons advocating against the violence, racism, and systematic injustice in the US – we urge you to be mindful of your mental health and well-being during this time. Engage when you can, how you can. 
  1. No act is too big or too little. Share the post, respond to the comment. Have conversations with friends and family. Encourage engagement and active involvement. Attend a peaceful protest. Translate resources/terminology in your native language. Do more research and learn. Support and donate how and when you can. 
  1. Cancel culture is easy and can be counterproductive in the bigger picture of moving towards a more more peaceful and compassionate world. Engage how you can. 
  1. You  may not know the exact answer or solution. Show up anyway. Lean into the learning. 
  1. Everyone has a role to play in the social change ecosystem – learn your role.
  1. Help how you can, when you can, where you can.

We acknowledge all of you who have, are, and will use you voice to amplify the echos of thousands, if not millions around the world toward a just, fair, and safe society. 

We see you and we thank you.  

In Solidarity, 

Alexandria, Vannary, and Somaya